curvrd spoiler1Dirt track aerodynamics and spoiler shape

Let me start this first attempt by saying I’m here to help you as much as I can. I have a new email address, Kevinlincoln@hogantechnologies.com if anyone would like to email me questions, ideas for me to look at, or things you may have tried in the past. Things that should have worked but didn’t and maybe I can see why or what needed to be changed. With that in mind I will be using those e-mails as article material that way I can cover the things that really interest or bother you the most.

So let start by finding out what things are really of concern with dirt track aerodynamics, and to what classes. Late Model guys are more concerned with roof angles, and front end configurations (or at least that seems to be what I’m asked most about). Whereas Modified guys in general seem to be wondering what can I do if anything to make my mod more aerodynamic. So with most of my background in open wheel classes, let’s look at areas that the mod guys can help themselves.

Unique spoilers

The big area is spoilers and the angle of attack. If your rules state you have to have a certain angle one of the easiest ways to gain more down force (you will increase drag a little, but not enough to worry about on 3/8th or less) is to get away from straight blade spoilers. You need to change to a  what I will call a “Lazy C” shape if you look at it from the side. Whether you run 4,6,or even 8” spoilers changing from the normal straight blade to the “C” will really help. Think of the old game you use to play as a kid going down the road with your hand out the window. Let’s play again. Put your hand out the window going down the road at 60+ with it held at about the angle that your spoiler runs and feel the pull. Now without moving your wrist slowly close your fingers to form the “Lazy C” feel the difference. Whether you run Lexan or Aluminum this is easy to do with a sheet metal brake and about ½ hour. Time well spent when you get it in place. Just remember if your rules call for a certain height you need to still use that same width of material even though your spoiler may be lower than before. If you don’t have anybody in your area that can fabricate this spoiler for you, just e-mail me here and I can bend and send one to you. I’ll make it short this time, and remember I’ll be using your e-mails as topic material so if you have something you’d like me to talk about let me know.

Thanks again until next time, when if I don’t have anything from you we will talk about front nose areas or double skinned roofs.

Kevin Lincoln